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Valo Jhanna

The material exploration for this project investigate how wood and light can interact and how designer can begin to curate light through wood, by experimenting with white pine. Design process of the Mosque involves exploring the filtering light and the interaction of the Qibla wall with both winter and summer sun angles. With a strong connection to the place by using local finish wood and connecting it to its site. The translucent wood panels become a beacon to the exterior through the use of artificial light, acting as a symbolic lantern calling Muslims to prayer.

The design of the building was done through the act of capturing feelings and moments through a series of collages. The final design of the building bridges a gap between Secular and Non-Secular building. To provide a community space for the Islamic minority in Helsinki.

Student, Suleman Khan

Professor Dr. Tammy Gaber

Suomenusko Perinteiden Talo

Following words provided by Marina Schwellnus:

Design began with the Festival Hall. It was to be a spatial extension of the tables designed previously, with enough room for four of the four-table square formations seen in the vignette on the right. It also needed to have a direct connection to an exterior space so celebrations could be carried outside, as well as the kitchen for the preparation of meals and feasts. In addition to the kitchen, a hearth would be integrated into the Festival Hall proper, similar to the stove in the Varhopatsastalo cabin and the hearths in sacred groves.

The Lecture Hall was the counterpart. It began with a preliminary design of a sacrifice room where animals could be killed and prepared for a sacrificial ritual at a sacred site. The design for that space was then transferred to a tear-drop shaped amphitheatre. This space is on the crevice axis and exits into a transition space with a window looking directly to the sea.

It should be noted that the overall concept revolved around the Hannunvaakuna symbol. The pattern on the festival tables was the first iteration, and it continued to evolve into a copper screen for the skylight in the Festival Hall, the lights in the same room (though this also took inspiration from the himmeli decorations), and the door handles in the building.

Finland Trip

Student, Marina Schwellnus

Professor Dr. Tammy Gaber